TFA Mohair Pattern Ideas

Yesterday I blogged a preview of tonight’s Pop Up Shop Update and mentioned that included in the offerings is a brand new TFA base: Mohair! I haven’t named it anything more clever than that because clever names just aren’t my style apparently, but I swear you will look very clever if you knit a lovely item with our new lace weight mohair yarn. :)

Before we go any further, here are a few yarn details you might be interested in.

TFA MOHAIR, The Details:
•72% Kid Mohair, 28% Silk

• 50g (1.76oz) = 420m (459yds)

• gauge: lace weight

• needle: varies per project

• hand wash, lay flat to dry.

• $34 a skein

Since deciding to carry a mohair base I’ve been scouring Ravelry for pattern inspiration and I have some thoughts: The first is that, though lovely on it’s own, it’s far more approachable when held together with a strand of something else. Knitting with lace weight mohair can be daunting. But held with a strand of fingering weight merino and suddenly you’re knitting a dk weight sweater with the world’s most heavenly halo ever and that’s totally doable. I’ve done this in the past and am currently working on a sweater holding PureWash Fingering together with a strand of lace weight mohair and it is pure heaven. You can use this approach for just about any pattern really. I have found that adding a strand of mohair tends to increase my gauge by 1 level, so fingering weight becomes dk, dk becomes worsted, worsted becomes aran… you get the idea.

Elton  by Joji Locatelli,  Cumulus Blouse  by PetiteKnit,  Soirée  by Emily Foden   Cedar Point  by Espace Tricot,  Rainbow Solo  by Lene Holme Samsøe,  Iskald  by Caitlin Hunter   No Frills Sweater  by PetiteKnit,  Amali Sweater  by Marion Em Knits,  Tutu Top  by Lisa Chemery

Elton by Joji Locatelli, Cumulus Blouse by PetiteKnit, Soirée by Emily Foden

Cedar Point by Espace Tricot, Rainbow Solo by Lene Holme Samsøe, Iskald by Caitlin Hunter

No Frills Sweater by PetiteKnit, Amali Sweater by Marion Em Knits, Tutu Top by Lisa Chemery

There are a few designers who have loads of patterns that specifically call for this double strand technique, Petite Knits is well known for it. I’m currently knitting her No Frills sweater and it is life changing! I’d also be remiss if I didn’t mention Espace Tricot who have been adding a strand of mohair to so many different projects over the years I’ve lost count! A simple hat knit with a strand of mohair and merino feels so elevated. When picking colours to pair together in this style you can’t go wrong with tonal shades. I would probably advise against anything too high contrast as you’ll get a marled affect on top of the added halo and it could end up looking quite busy. It doesn’t have to be an exact match, but I find the look really successful when the colours paired give the halo without too much marling. Make sense?

The other approach to mohair garments that I love to see is when it’s worked in stripes with a heavier weight yarn like in Joji Locatelli’s Elton cardigan. It’s a beautifully striking look. But then again, used all on it’s own in the world’s lightest, airiest garment and is incredibly dreamy, as long as you’ve got the stamina for a lace weight garment! Lastly, this version of the Rainbow Solo sweater (above centre) isn’t on Ravelry but I am crazy about it and it may very well inspire my next mohair sweater project!

How about some mohair neck-wear?

Truffula Tuft  by Webster Street Knittery,  Birds of a Feather  by Andrea Mowry,  Cheri Chevron Shawl  by Ambah O'Brien   Chevron Cloud  by Espace Tricot,  Welted Cowl  by Jane Richmond,  Seascape Stole  by Kieran Foley   Belu  by Camille Descoteaux,  Willow  by Nancy Marchant,  Baseline  by Beata Jezek

Truffula Tuft by Webster Street Knittery, Birds of a Feather by Andrea Mowry, Cheri Chevron Shawl by Ambah O'Brien

Chevron Cloud by Espace Tricot, Welted Cowl by Jane Richmond, Seascape Stole by Kieran Foley

Belu by Camille Descoteaux, Willow by Nancy Marchant, Baseline by Beata Jezek

Shawls, scarves and cowls are obvious choices for some mohair glam because who wouldn’t want to cozy up with super soft fabric around their neck? Chevrons seem to be big and so is the striping a fingering weight with a lace weight mohair trend. The juxtaposition of light and airy lace with the denser merino fingering is so appealing.

So, basically, you can’t go wrong! I am no expert on mohair, I’ve only just started experimenting with it more seriously, but I’m happy to see it’s made a comeback. My mom is a lifelong mohair fan and I’m excited to see what she knits with it. What would you knit with TFA mohair?